Advanced Emergency Relief System Design | AIChE

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Advanced Emergency Relief System Design

OSHA has recognized Design Institute for Emergency Relief System (DIERS) methods as good engineering practice for process safety management of highly hazardous materials. If you’re responsible for the safe handling of the effluent from relief systems, this advanced course will teach you how to apply the DIERS techniques for providing adequate pressure relief for runaway reactions and other pressure-producing events. If you are just starting out, take the basic course on the topic (CH172).

Applying DIERS Technology in Your Facility

This course covers the Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) techniques for providing adequate pressure relief for runaway reactions and other pressure-producing events that result in two-phase flow.Each participant receives the texts: Emergency Relief Systems Design Using DIERS Technology (published by AIChE), and Guidelines for Pressure Relief and Effluent Handling Systems (published by CCPS and includes SC Lite computer code license).

Learning Outcomes:

  • Discuss elements of emergency relief system design with an emphasis on DIERS methodology.
  • Describe design practices in emergency pressure relief and effluent containment in compliance with established codes.
  • Employ DIERS technology for data acquisition and two-phase venting calculations.
  • Research and learn how to Test computational models and computer programs as well as the effects in real-world scenarios.
  • Discuss the complex field and some of the many steps in becoming an ERS engineer.
  • Evaluate resources and references that guide further development of ERS engineers.

Who Should Attend: (Please note prerequisites below)

Engineers responsible for operating, designing or managing chemical processes that require emergency overpressure relief devices to ensure the safety of the facility in the event of runaway reactions or other pressure-producing events. Engineers who want to learn more about state-of-the-art venting and flow technology or those responsible for the safe handling of the effluent from an emergency relief device will find this course invaluable.

Prerequisites

The course assumes that the attendees have thorough understanding and real-world experience working with the basic chemical engineering principles of reaction kinetics, fluid flow, thermodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and heat and material balances.  Further, some application of these disciplines in basic emergency relief system design or evaluation is expected.

Day One

8:00 – 8:30 

Registration

8:30 – 10:00 

Introduction to ERS Design
  • DIERS/DIERS Users Group
  • Case Histories
  • ERS Design Goals/Strategy

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon 

Introduction to ERS Design (continued)
  • Energy/Material Balances; Physical Property Treatment
  • Impact of Two-Phase Vessel Venting and ERS Flow
  • Codes, Terms, Devices, and Rules

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

Vessel Disengagement Dynamics
  • Two-Phase Venting Conditions
  • Coupling Equation; Vapor/Liquid Disengagement Models

3:00 – 3:15 

Afternoon Break

3:15 – 5:30

Vessel Disengagement Dynamics (continued)
  • Experimental Verification
  • Prediction of Two-Phase Flow Onset/Disengagement

Day Two

8:00 – 10:00 

Vent Flow Dynamics
  • Technology Base (Two Phase Flow Methods)
  • Fundamental Flow Equations
  • Experimental Verification

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon

Vent Flow Dynamics (continued)
  • Code Compliant Design
  • Calculation via “CCflow” or SC Lite code with provided license
  • Example Problems in provided texts

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

Simplified Reactive Case ERS Design
  • Data Acquisition via Bench-Scale Testing

3:00 – 3:15 

Afternoon Break

3:15 – 5:30

Simplified Reactive Case ERS Design (continued)

  • Experimental Reactive Case ERS Design
  • Simplified Reactive-Case Design Equations with Example Problems

Day Three

8:00 – 10:00 

Computerized ERS Design Methods (Simulation)
  • Advantages of Design by digital simulation; Example Problem

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon 

Computerized ERS Design Methods (continued)
  • SuperChems for DIERS Capabilities and Demonstration

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

ERS Effluent Handling
  • Effluent Handling Strategies, Separators and Quench Pool Designs
  • Example Effluent Handling Problems Using “CCflow” programs

For any questions, please email academy@fontelearn.com. Times displayed are in EST.

Day One

9:30 – Noon

Introduction to Advanced Emergency Relief System (ERS) Design
  • DIERS/DIERS Users Group
  • Case Histories
  • Emergency Relief Requirements -Goals & Strategy
  • Physical Properties/Material and Energy Balances
  • Impact of Two-Phase Venting
  • Codes, Terms, Devices and Rules

Noon – 12:30 

Lunch Break

12:30 – 2:30 

Vessel Dynamics – 1
  • Introduction to Two-Phase Flow Onset/Disengagement
  • Coupling Equation and Vapor/Liquid Disengagement Models

Day Two

9:30 – Noon 

Vessel Dynamics – 2
  • Experimental Verification
  • Prediction of Two-Phase Flow Onset/Disengagement

Noon – 12:30 

Lunch Break

12:30 – 2:30

Vent Flow Dynamics  - 1
  • Fundamentals, Terminology, Nomenclature
  • Critical Flow Phenomena
  • Ideal Flow Models for Nozzles

Day Three

9:30 – Noon

Vent Flow Dynamics  - 2
  • Fundamentals - Ideal Flow Models for Pipes
  • Code-Compliant Design 
  • Computations using provided programs

Noon – 12:30 

Lunch Break

12:30 – 2:30

Simplified ERS Design Methods  - 1
  • Introduction
  • Experimental Data Acquisition
  • Direct Scaling

Day Four

9:30 – Noon

Simplified ERS Design Methods  - 2
  • Analytical Methods
  • Example Problem

Noon – 12:30 

Lunch Break

12:30 - 2:30

Computerized ERS Design Methods 
  • Computer Programs
  • SUPERCHEMS for DIERS Computer Program

Day Five

9:30 – Noon 

ERS Effluent Handling

Noon – 12:30 

Lunch Break

12:30 – 2:30

ERS Effluent Handling Continued

Day One

8:00 – 8:30 

Registration

8:30 – 10:00 

Introduction to ERS Design
  • DIERS/DIERS Users Group
  • Case Histories
  • ERS Design Goals/Strategy

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon 

Introduction to ERS Design (continued)
  • Energy/Material Balances; Physical Property Treatment
  • Impact of Two-Phase Vessel Venting and ERS Flow
  • Codes, Terms, Devices, and Rules

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

Vessel Disengagement Dynamics
  • Two-Phase Venting Conditions
  • Coupling Equation; Vapor/Liquid Disengagement Models

3:00 – 3:15 

Afternoon Break

3:15 – 5:30

Vessel Disengagement Dynamics (continued)
  • Experimental Verification
  • Prediction of Two-Phase Flow Onset/Disengagement



Day Two

8:00 – 10:00 

Vent Flow Dynamics
  • Technology Base (Two Phase Flow Methods)
  • Fundamental Flow Equations
  • Experimental Verification

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon

Vent Flow Dynamics (continued)
  • Code Compliant Design
  • Calculation via “CCflow” or SC Lite code with provided license
  • Example Problems in provided texts

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

Simplified Reactive Case ERS Design
  • Data Acquisition via Bench-Scale Testing

3:00 – 3:15 

Afternoon Break

3:15 – 5:30

Simplified Reactive Case ERS Design (continued)

  • Experimental Reactive Case ERS Design
  • Simplified Reactive-Case Design Equations with Example Problems



Day Three

8:00 – 10:00 

Computerized ERS Design Methods (Simulation)
  • Advantages of Design by digital simulation; Example Problem

10:00 – 10:15 

Morning Break

10:15 – Noon 

Computerized ERS Design Methods (continued)
  • SuperChems for DIERS Capabilities and Demonstration

Noon – 1:00 

Lunch Break

1:00 – 3:00 

ERS Effluent Handling
  • Effluent Handling Strategies, Separators and Quench Pool Designs
  • Example Effluent Handling Problems Using “CCflow” programs
A laptop is required for this course. Find answers to questions about registration and refunds, tuition and fees, travel and lodging (for location-based courses), how eLearning courses work, how credits work, and more. 

Go to FAQs Page

  • Course ID:
    CH173
  • Source:
    DIERS - Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems
  • Language:
    English
  • Skill Level:
    Advanced
  • Duration:
    3 days
  • CEUs:
    2.25
  • PDHs:
    22.50
  • Accrediting Agencies:
    Florida
    New Jersey
    New York
    RCEP
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